Almond Macarons

I am SO sorry my foodie friends. Life has been insane and I haven’t had a chance to come on here and share some recipes. So, to make up for it, I’m going to share one each day up until Christmas. Sound good? Well let’s get to it!

Today, we have a simple recipe that I adapted from the awesome cookbook, Country Cooking of France. 

Almond Macarons

Almond Macarons

Ingredients

  • 2 egg whites, room temperature, whisked until very frothy. More may be needed.
  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1/2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1/4 tsp almond extract (or more to taste)
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla extract (or more to taste)

Instructions

  1. Whisk those egg whites! Prepare a baking sheet with silpat sheets or parchment paper.
  2. Throw the rest of the ingredients in your food processor. Pulse once or twice to mix it up.
  3. Now, put your whisked frothy egg whites in there too.
  4. Pulse until it forms a ball. If it seems to dry, add more whisked egg white.
  5. Now, run on high for 3-4 minutes until it forms a smooth, sticky paste.
  6. To bake, I like to put the dough into a pastry bag and squirt out cute little stars. My kiddo loves it, but you can also just roll into small balls and flatten them with your hands.
  7. Bake for 10-15 minutes, depending on the site of the cookie. To prevent cracking, you might want to hit the pan on your stove once. That'll get some of those air bubbles out. I personally don't care. I'm all about taste.
  8. Once they're done, remove and let cool fully. If you used parchment, you can pour some water underneath onto the hot pan to get the cookies to destick.
  9. Enjoy!
http://coasttocoastpaleo.com/2013/12/almond-macarons/

Apple Custard Cake

This recipe is a grain free, sugar free modification of a recipe from my favorite cookbook, Around My French Table. It is the reason I bought it. Her publisher had shared the recipe, along with her awesome stuffed pumpkin recipe, on Amazon. I tried them, they were awesome, and I was sold. This is our “go to” cookbook. We both have loved everything we’ve made from it.

Obviously, this isn’t paleo since I use grassfed butter. However, it’s worth it folks.

Apple Custard Cake

Apple Custard Cake

Ingredients

  • 1 cup almond flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder (I make my own with arrowroot powder, cream of tartar, and baking soda)
  • Pinch of salt
  • 4 large apples
  • 2 large eggs
  • ½ cup coconut sugar
  • 3 tablespoons dark rum
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 4 tablespoons grassfed unsalted butter, melted and cooled

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 F.
  2. Butter pan of your choice (The original recipe suggested using a springform pan. I usually just use my Emile Henry which doesn’t make as nice of a presentation). If using a springform pan, put it on a baking sheet lined with a silicone baking mat or parchment paper.
  3. Whisk the flour, baking powder, and salt together in a little bowl.
  4. Peel the apples (if that’s what you prefer. I like the skins on!), cut them in half and core them. Cut the apples into chunks.
  5. In a stand mixer, beat the eggs with a whisk until they’re foamy. Pour in the sugar and whisk for a minute or two to blend. Whisk in the rum and vanilla. Whisk in half the flour and when it is incorporated, add half the melted butter, followed by the rest of the flour and the remaining butter, mixing gently after each addition so that you have a smooth, rather thick batter. Now, switch to a rubber spatula and fold in the apples, making sure you coat the apples in the batter.
  6. Put it in your pan, and try to use the spat to even things out a bit.
  7. Bake for 50 to 60 minutes, or until the top of the cake is golden brown and a knife inserted deep into the center comes out clean.
  8. These directions are from the original recipe author for springform pan users.
  9. Transfer to a cooling rack and let rest for 5 minutes. The cake may have pulled away from the edges of the pan. If using a springform pan, carefully run a blunt knife around the edges of the cake and remove the sides of the springform pan. (Open the springform slowly, and before it’s fully opened, make sure there aren’t any apples stuck to it.) Allow the cake to cool until it is just slightly warm or at room temperature. If you want to remove the cake from the bottom of the springform pan, wait until the cake is almost cooled, then run a long spatula between the cake and the pan, cover the top of the cake with a piece of parchment or wax paper, and invert it onto a rack. Carefully remove the bottom of the pan and turn the cake over onto a serving dish.
http://coasttocoastpaleo.com/2013/11/apple-custard-cake/

Huckleberry (or Blueberry) & Port Wine Sorbet

Today I want to pay homage to my new home, Seattle. I am absolutely loving living here. It is completely different from my home state (Wisconsin) and my home of the past 8 years (Southern California). I know some people complain about the rain, but honestly, it’s worth it when I get to enjoy gorgeous mountains, beautiful greenery, an awesome growing season for my container garden and like minded foodies! 😉

I have been LOVING these farmers markets. They’re not as big as some of the ones we frequented in Southern California (like the one in Hollywood), but they are jam packed full of AWESOMENESS. One of the awesome things I recently discovered were wild mushrooms and huckleberries. There is a vendor at the Seattle markets that just specializes in collecting wild edibles. How nifty is that? I immediately had to learn more about these fabulous foods so I bought Pacific Feast: A Cook’s Guide to West Coast Foraging and Cuisine. It is jam packed full of wonderful information on foraging and delicious recipes to make with your findings. This is my modification of one of my favorites. Enjoy!

Huckleberry (or Blueberry) & Port Wine Sorbet

Huckleberry (or Blueberry) & Port Wine Sorbet

Ingredients

  • 1 cup port wine
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/3 cup honey (more if you prefer sweeter or if your berries are tart)
  • 8 cups huckleberries (blueberries work as well)

Instructions

  1. In a small saucepan, over medium heat, bring your wine water and honey to a simmer.
  2. Once simmering, add berries and return it to a simmer.
  3. Once it has simmered again, remove from heat and cool.
  4. Puree in a food processor or using an immersion blender. Strain if you prefer a smoother sorbet. I personally don't mind the skins.
  5. Follow directions on your ice cream maker for freezing. If you don't have one, freeze in a shallow glass baking pan. Cut it into chunks and then run through food processor to smooth it out. Refreeze again for 3-4 hours.
http://coasttocoastpaleo.com/2013/10/huckleberry-port-sorbet/

**Note: This recipe is modified from “Huckleberry and Port Wine Sorbet” in Pacific Feast: A Cook’s Guide to West Coast Foraging and Cuisine. PNWers, or those interested in wild edibles, this is a must read!**

Maple vanilla custard

MapleVanillaCustard

Well, since my introduction and first post was all about how much I love dairy and how to make wise dairy choices, I just had to put together a custard recipe for ya’ll. Custard is one of my favorite things to make – baked or frozen. For today’s recipe, you’re getting the baked kind with my absolute favorite sweetener – maple syrup. YUM!

Now, I’ve heard from friends and family that they believe custard is difficult to make with the right texture. What it really comes down to is tempering the eggs and using a water bath. Tempering is the process of bringing the eggs up to the same temperature as the heated cream slowly so that you do not curdle them. A water bath is when you put your ramekins in a pan surrounded by water so that all your dishes cook evenly and slowly. Water is an awesome conductor for heat. I highly recommend getting Chicago Metallic’s Creme Brulee ramekin set. It makes water baths and getting the ramekins in and out of the oven so easy. All you have to do is put the ramekins in their holders than fill up the pan around them. DONE!

Well enough technique chatting from me. Let’s get to the deliciousness, right?

Maple Vanilla Custard

Ingredients

  • 1 1/3 cup heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup (I recommend Grade B or local.)
  • 2 tsps vanilla extract
  • 4 large egg yolks (already at room temperature if you can remember!)

Instructions

  1. Preheat your oven to 325 degrees.
  2. Heat up heavy cream gently in saucepan until steaming. Be sure to stir so that it doesn't get a film on top.
  3. While the cream is heating up, get your yolks ready. Whisk yolks with maple syrup & vanilla. Be sure to not leave maple syrup sitting in yolks unmixed. It'll actually "cook" the yolks. Ew! I usually wait to whisk this all together until the cream is almost ready.
  4. Now it's tempering time. Take the hot cream off the burner. Now, a 1/4 cup at a time, whisk it into the egg mixture. Be sure to be whisking while pouring. Keep going until it's all mixed together. The mixture should be a pretty yellow color now with no solid bits. If this is true, then you have successfully tempered. WAY TO GO!
  5. Pour into four small ramekins, distributing evenly. Place ramekins into water bath and put heavy pan in the oven. I fill my water bath just up to the middle holder or the trim of the ramekins.
  6. Now, a side note, if you'd rather have a smoother top texture, be sure to skim away any bubbles that formed from whisking. Personally, I love that texture on top. It's my favorite part!
  7. Bake for 45-65 minutes. You can tell when the custards are done by gently jiggling the pan. If the custards jiggle just a tiny bit in the middle, then they're done! Chill or eat warm. They will thicken as they cool.
http://coasttocoastpaleo.com/2013/04/maple-vanilla-custard/

Enjoy!